Digital Storage Converter

digital storage /ˌækˌsɛləˈreɪʃən/

noun

Computing The act of recording digital information for computational use


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Digital storage conversion rates

1 Byte = 8 Bits

1 Kibibit = 1024 Bits

Kilo = 10³  ,  Mega = 10⁶  ,  Giga = 10⁹  ,  Tera = 10¹²  ,  Peta = 10¹⁵ 

Digital storage info

The word bit is a portmanteau (merging) of the two words binary and unit. It is the most basic of the digital storage units, of which all others are multiples of. It is often shown as being an object with a value of either 0 or 1, thus binary. There are any number of ways that bits can store data. For example, as electrical charge level, magnetic polarity (+ or -), or the presence or absence of a pit in a disc.

8 bits make up a byte and therefore it can be used to create up to 256 values, as there are 2⁸ combinations of 8 bits. It began to be used in the 1950s and 60s, and 8 bits were also known as an octet before 8 bits per byte was solidified.

By comparison, the introduction of the kibibit and kibibyte in 1998 allows for a distinction from the kilo. It ensures that the prefix kilo is not colloquially used to denote both 1000 and 1024 (they equate to 2¹⁰ bits and bytes respectively). Hence, 1 Mebibit = 1024² bits, whereas 1 Megabit = 1000² bits.

The prefixes of bit and byte go beyond peta as follows; Kilo = 10³  ,  Mega = 10⁶  ,  Giga = 10⁹  ,  Tera = 10¹²  ,  Peta = 10¹⁵  , exa = 10¹⁸ , zetta = 10²¹ , yotta = 10²⁴.